John I, Count of Holland

Father:      Floris V, Count of Holland (1254-1296)

Mother:      Beatrice of Flanders (~1260-1296)

Birth:      1284      Holland1

Death:      10 Nov 1299      Haarlem, Holland

“He was then staying at Haarlem, and was seized by a dysentery, which in a short time carried him off, on the vespers of St. Martin, November 10th, 1299 (Vossius, p. 204. Chron. Holl. Cott. MS., Vitellius, E. VI., f.114. Buxhornzuerius, Theatrum Hollandiae, p. 132). Strong suspicions existed that there had been foul play in the business; and although the Earl of Hainault was absent in France at the time of his nephew’s death, there were dark surmisings as to the share he had taken in a catastrophe (Vossius, p. 204)”2; “The Chronologia Johannes de Beke records the death ‘1299 IV Kal Nov apud Harlem’ of ‘Iohannes domicellus’ (Chronologia Johannes de Beke 77b, p. 253). Count Jan died of a gastric complaint, allegedly poisoned by Comte Jean who succeeded him as Count of Holland (Ghent, pp. 42-3).”1

Burial:      Dordrecht, Holland, Netherlands

“The deceased earl was honourably interred at Dort (Barlandus, Hollandiae Comitum Historia, p. 44. Maeldwyck Cronycke).”2

Occupation:            Count of Holland 1296-1299

Spouse:

Princess Elizabeth Plantagenet of England

Marriage:      8 Jan 1297      Ipswich, Suffolk

“The marriage took place in the priory church of Ipswich, on Monday, the 8th of January, 1297 (Foedera, vol. i., p.850. Ward. Book, 25 Edward I, f.6.b. Leland’s Collect. vol. i., p. 180.), and at the close of the ceremony high mass was performed, and offerings made at the great altar of the church. As usual, money was placed upon the missal with the spousal ring, and when the bridal cortege left the church, large sums were squandered among the crowds. The king kept open house in honour of the day, and all the friars of Ipswich, friars preachers, friars minors, and Carmelites, were feasted at his expense.”2

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Sources

1. Charles Cawley, “Medieval Lands (Foundation For Medieval Genealogy),” http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands, 2006-2008.

2. Mary Anne Everett Green, Lives of the Princesses of England from the Norman Conquest, Volume 3 (London: 1851), pp. 13, 30.